[Now Hiring] Full-Time, Part-Time, and Freelance Writing Jobs Available

Brad Smith


I'm the creator of this site (Grammar Gang). I'm also the founder of Codeless, a long-form content creation company that's been featured in The New York Times, Business Insider, The Next Web, and hundreds more.

We produce around ~100 long, in-depth articles each month. So we're relying on these tools on a daily basis. Here, I break down the good, bad, and uuuuuuggggllllyyyy.
Brad Smith

We’re looking for new writers for both this site (Grammar Gang) and also our parent company (Codeless). Here’s what we’re looking for on each:

grammar gang logo

Topics: Freelancing, writing, and grammar.

Writers: Beginner, intermediate, and advanced.

Pay: $75-500/per article.

Topics: SaaS, B2B, ecommerce, and affiliate content.

Writers: Intermediate to advanced.

Pay: $150-500/per article. $30-80k/year.

Interested? Please provide your details below.

We’ll be in touch soon if it looks like a good fit.

Bonus: 100+ new writing jobs (updated daily)

We’re also updating this page with brand new writing jobs every few days. These include everything from full-time, to part-time, and even freelance writing gigs.

How do these writing jobs work?

We’re pulling in the latest feeds from the ProBlogger Job Board, We Work Remotely, Indeed, and ZipRecruiter. The first two usually offer more freelance and part-time roles, while the second two big ones tend to include more full-time writing jobs.

Based on our experience, these tend to to be the “best” writing jobs across these big services. They provide enough volume so you constantly get new results. But they also tend to have the highest quality results, too, for people looking for new freelance work ASAP.

We’re also trying to help you consolidate them all in one place, so that you don’t have to visit every single website, every single day. You can just browse these writing gigs as they pop up and only pursue the ones that look legit.

How do I know you know what you’re talking about?

Brad was a freelance writer before founding a content company. Our company has also reviewed over 3,000 writing applicants in the last two years, hiring dozens of writers in the process. So we’ve been on both sides of the metaphorical table.

What’s the difference between good vs. bad writing jobs?

Not all job offers are good offers. Not all clients are good clients.

Beyond the money, there needs to be a good fit between you and the potential employer.

Over time, you’ll learn what ‘good’ opportunities look like vs. ‘bad’ ones. And the red flags will jump off the page, giving you a bad feeling in the pit of your stomach to avoid that position at all cost.

Here are a few good examples to look for, along with a few bad ones to avoid.

Long-term commitment. The key to freelancing is to have ongoing work you can count on. That starts with having some long-term commitment to the initial number of pieces you might be working on any given month. However, the flip side is that employers should also respect your time and not expect ‘overtime’ work for free. Here’s an example from one of our job descriptions:

“We always have extra work to go around. And we’ll pay you for content above and beyond your normal capacity. So in addition to the normal pay hikes as you get better (see below), we’ll always have extra work you can take on if you’re interested in working overtime.”

Example 1

Transparency. We’re all adults here. Or, at least, we should be. That means you need to know the facts before potentially committing so no one is wasting their time. It’s better you find out that the position isn’t a good fit up front, rather than go through endless rounds of interviews over the course of a few weeks. Here’s another example from our job description:

“No, we won’t pay you $500+ per post to begin. For a number of reasons, but mostly, you won’t be worth $500+ per post in the early goings for what we’re looking for. (Harsh, I know.) But we can start you at $5k per month if you’re good. And lots more, as you begin mastering client style guides, requiring less oversight from our team of editors. We don’t care if you’re 19 or 59. We want quality and will give you all the work and money available if you can deliver it.”

Example 2

Those are just a few of the ‘good’ things to look for. Again, disqualifying yourself or the client immediately is better than getting too deep and hating your life. So here are a few examples to watch out for that could backfire miserably.

Dumb/vague requirements. SEO = Search Engine Optimization. So this says: “Search Engine Optimization-optimized copy.” Do you think anyone who actually understands what that is would write that?

Overbearing. Full or part-time people might need to jump on the phone once in awhile. Freelance or contractors? They want to treat you like a full-time team member without actually paying you like one. Hope you like delivering everything “ASAP.”

How do I land more writing jobs?

You might only get a ~10% response rate when applying to new full-time or contract writing jobs online initially. That’s not too bad believe it or not.

But with some experience, and with a few tricks up your sleeve, you’ll know exactly what to look for and increase that rate up to ~50% or more.

We put together a free 7-day email course that walks you through the main lessons Brad learned while going from zero to six-figure freelancing within 12 months.

Enter your email below to get the first lesson →